You might already know what career you would like to pursue when you are older but it is more likely that you don’t yet know what career you would prefer. The fact is that employment experts predict that students leaving school now will have, on average, eight different careers during their working life, at least half of which don’t yet exist, due to the rapidly developing nature of technology and employmentopportunities. It is, therefore, worth considering the idea that you might be best trying to decide on a starting career, rather than choosing a career for life.

Some of the best ways to work out a good starting career include:

  • Talking to your parents and their friends about their careers
  • Talking to the Careers Learning Development Manager at school
  • Talking to teachers
  • Gaining meaningful work experience
  • Using online careers tools

Careers Guidance and Work Experience support at The 鶹ӳ

The Careers team here at The 鶹ӳ stronglybelieve Post-16 and Post-18 choices are very important in the journey to a stable and happy career. We welcome providers from all technical routes to speak with our students to ensure they progress on the pathway that is right for them. If you are a provider and wish to speak to our students, please follow the process on ourProvider Access Statement.

How we measure and assess our provision

The 鶹ӳ strives to ensure our young people are receiving the most relevant opportunities, led by labour market information, with equality and access to all options in the forefront of our minds. We do this in a number of ways;

We identify and analyse the destinations of our Year 11 and 13 students taking into account their prior attainment. For Year 11 students, we record their intended and actual pathways.

For Year 13 students we identify and analyse whether students:

  • go onto higher education and the range of courses being studied and the universities/colleges being attended
  • go onto an apprenticeship and whether it is at Intermediate, Advanced or Higher (degree) level
  • go onto full-time employment or take a gap year.

Students are sent a survey to complete after each live/virtual careers event which helps us plan for future programmes and ensure we are achieving our aims and outcomes for each year group. An additional survey, available to complete at any time of the year, is promoted on our Careers Bulletin to give our students a voice about what industries or job roles they would like to see more information on and understand the pathways into the sector.

“I have deepened my understanding and knowledge of the work industry- mainly hairdressing. This is through using people and collaborative skills.”

Work Experience at: Pola Hair Studio LTC, 2022

“I found it useful to learn some key features of working in branch banking which I can use to find a job in banking in the future.”

Work Experience at: Natwest Bank, 2022

“Generally I liked my work experience placement. It provided me with an insight into the industrial side of things and showed me the process of how medical stuff is applied, stored and shipped out to be used worldwide and around the UK. It also allowed me to have an insight on stock management and how to improvise if a certain product is out of stock, Diasorin in Dartford was a fun experience!”

Work Experience at: DiaSorin Italia S.p.A. UK Branch, 2022

We value the views of parents/carers on how well we have helped them to support their child or children make rational informed career decisions therefore parents/carers are invited to contact the careers team at The 鶹ӳ to discuss this. Click here to contact us.

We work closely with the Careers & Enterprise Company and our Enterprise Coordinator to ensure that our provision provides excellent opportunities for students to prepare for the next stage of their chosen career pathway. We also ask business volunteers to provide feedback on the careers events that they take part in, such as careers talks, presentations and workshops.

In addition, we ask all employers who provide work experience placements, to provide evaluations and testimonials on students and The 鶹ӳ. Read a selection from 2022 below!

“Brilliant, Reliable and always happy to assist.”

Guaranty Trust Bank (UK) Limited, 2022

“It was a pleasure to have your student with us for the week. He showed maturity and a willingness to work on his own and as part of a team. He will do well in his chosen career path. A credit to The 鶹ӳ.”

Your Picking Solutions Ltd, 2022

“Your student made The 鶹ӳ very proud by representing them here. She was helpful, enthusiastic and very kind. It was a joy to have her for the week, a true natural.”

Rainbow Day Nursery, 2022

“Your student was a brilliant addition to our team here at University Hospital Lewisham. He was punctual, professional and enthusiastic – a winning formula. He displayed brilliant communication skills with both patients and professionals alike, and worked well in a multidisciplinary team in various environments, conducting a range of diagnostic tests. He is confident, a brilliant team player and a hard worker. It was a pleasure having him with us.”

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust, 2022

‘Careerpilot’ is a GREAT website that can help students to explore career options. They can identify future careers – based on their preferences, skills and aptitude – and then find out what qualifications they need and whether they are better off going straight into employment at the end of Post-16, taking an apprenticeship at the end of Year 11 or at the end of Post-16 or going to university after Post-16. This service is FREE and can be accessed at:

Another really useful tool you can use to help you to decide your future is to take a Morrisby Test. While this is not a free service, you pay once and then have lifetime access to the service. This could be really handy, given how many careers experts estimate that students leaving school now are likely to have! You can access Morrisby by visiting: .

However you decide what your preferred starting career will be, it’s really important to know what level and type of qualifications you will need to access that career and to then make your Post-16 options accordingly.

Key Stage 3 and 4 Careers Information

Careers learning and Planning is for all age groups

Many people think that KS3 is “too early” to be told about careers planning and learning about future options. Nothing could be further from the truth. Planning early consistently shows progression and success in future years.

“The fast-changing world of work puts an ever-greater demand on all of us to support young people in making a successful transition from education to employment, helping them to identify and choose careers opportunities that are right for them”
CEO, Careers & Enterprise Company

Here are some websites that may help you with this:

Ǿ…

You have some important decisions to make in terms of what will occur after Year 11. It is important to make the right decisions as the next three years of your education could shape your whole career path and working life.

Some things you may want to consider when looking at the options and possible future decisions:

  • What are your strengths and areas for improvement?
  • What do you enjoy?
  • What are your expected grades?
  • Are these grades realistic?
  • Do you have a career idea in mind?
  • Are you considering university in the future?

It helps to start planning and researching into some of your ideas at the end of Year 10 so you are prepared to make these decisions atthe early stage of Year 11. Talk with your parents / carers, teacher, tutors and other students.

Options after Year 11 include:

  • Further Education Colleges
  • Apprenticeships

Always consider a backup plan. You have the opportunity of applying to more than one Post 16 scheme of learning.For example: if applying for an apprenticeship, you should apply to college / school as a backup.

If you are applying for a Level 3 course either at College or in Sixth Form, looking into the Level 2 courses if you are at risk of not achieving the entry grades.

Apprenticeships offer the opportunity to learn in the workplace. You will be taken on by an employer who teaches you practical skills relating to the occupational area that you have chosen. You will spend one day a weekat college where you will gain the theoretical support to achieve the specific qualifications for your chosen career area. You will be paid approximately £100 a week.

To research into different apprenticeship schemes look atwhich has a wealth of information and advertises a number of vacancies. Register on the site if you are interested in receiving details on specific apprenticeships schemes.

Some companies have set timescales when they recruit. It is important if you are considering an apprenticeship scheme that you look into opportunities and apply early.

Advanced Apprenticeships

A typical entry criteria:A minimum of 3GCSEs (or equivalent) to include an A-C pass in English Language, double Science and Maths.

Local Colleges: Local further education colleges offer a range of different courses. Colleges to consider are:

  • – Dartford and Gravesend
  • – Bromley
  • – Hadlow College delivers hand based courses from their Tonbridge and Mottingham sites
  • – The University for the Creative Arts is a specialist college for students wishing to follow art / design related careers.

After Post-16

There will be students who have considered university from a very young age. You may have chosen a career that you can only do if you have studied at university. Some students may look into university as one of the possible options following Post 16.

Students who successfully graduate will earn more in the main than a student who has chosen not to go to university.

There are in excess of 50,000 degrees so it is important that you choose the right degree.

Unable to decide what course to study? Have a go at…

To research into the different courses with links to the universities look at

If youhave decided on going to university but cannot decide on a course, try the Stamford test on the UCAS site.

You can also try the Course Finder questionnaire on This is another free test which may help you choose your degree subject.There is additional information which may help you with your university decisions.

To discuss university courses in greater depth book a careers guidance interview with the Trust Careers Advisor.

Emaillesley.tannock@latrust.org.ukor contact your Head of Sixth Form or administration to request an appointment.

Useful websites

Having selected a number of universities you should now be considering visiting them. It is important to visit the universities as you will be spending three years or maybe four years in your chosen location. University is about Higher Education but it is also about you experiencing different environments and you must be happy with all of your five choices that will appear on your UCAS application form. Some universities like you to book their open days so it is important that you plan for your future.

  • – check out the dates of university open days.
  • – disability support.
  • – just prior to organising to visit universities you may be able to do a virtual tour of the university on YouTube. This could save you valuable time and money if you see something that you do not like online before you have travelled to the other end of the country.
  • –an alternative guide to researching universities.

Following the rise in tuition fees a number of students are considering combining a gap year with their studies by studying abroad. Certain European countries teach their university courses in English so it is a real possibility to spend three years in a foreign country while gaining a degree. University fees for some countries are considerably cheaper than studying in the United Kingdom.

Students can choose to study at a British university and spend a year abroad. Look into the different programmes of study on.These foreign courses are four year degree programmes with the third year in a foreign university.

Some students may consider studying at a British university and then spending a period studying at a European university. Erasmus Programme isa student exchange programme which promotes the growth of International Studying. Further details can be found at.

Useful websites

  • – for students looking to apply to an American university
  • – for students interested in European universities
  • – for students interested in studying a degree in Holland

Why choose a gap year?

Students who have chosen some of the competitive courses like Medicine, Veterinary, Law and Dentistry may choose a gap year as they may feel that they require additional work experience would enhance their personal statement. It is sometimes hard to complete all of the relevant work experience when you require a number of A grades at A level to be considered for a course.

Students who have aspirations of Cambridge and Oxford will have their grades before making an application if they have chosen to take a year out. Cambridge and Oxford look for the top academic students and as it is competitive students with guaranteed results may be selected over and above students without their results.

Students choose a gap year if they would like to gain some work experience. This may be to help finance their time at university or they may have chosen to gain some valuable experience in an industry which will ultimately help when they have graduated.

Students could choose a gap year to travel, either for a short period or maybe for the whole year giving themselves the opportunity to experience different cultures and meet new people.

Talented sport students may choose a year out to compete before committing themselves to full time study.

Useful websites

  • (Temporarily offline due to the pandemic)

When considering different careers it is critical to find out further information as some careers may require specific qualifications which you have not considered.

Here are some of the important questions to consider when deciding on different career paths.

  • Do I need to go to university?
  • What subjects do I require?
  • What other entry routes are there to my chosen career?
  • Is it a growth area or is it a declining industry?

To research into different careers please find below links to a number of relevant websites:

  • job profiles,entry requirements, training routes, salary and labour market information.
  • offers you the opportunity of starting with a simple psychometric test to establish more about your personality and will suggest some different career areas which you can research into. You will be able to watch numerous videos on different career areas. This website also includes the required entry routes, salaries and local labour market information.
  • some careers will specify that you will need a university degree. To research into different degree areas look at the University College Admission Services website. You will have the opportunity to establish which subjects you may require for certain degrees but also some of the grade boundaries that different universities are looking for.

Careerometer

The Careerometer widget provides access to a selection of headline data relating to pay, weekly hours of work and future employment prospects.

The data are organised by occupation: simply type in the title of the job you are interested in and the widget provides a series of options from which you can select the most relevant to you.

More detailed information regarding different job roles can be found on the.

Apprenticeships offer the opportunity to learn in the workplace. You will be taken on by an employer who teaches you practical skills relating to the occupational area that you have chosen. You will spend one day a weekat college where you will gain the theoretical support to achieve the specific qualifications for your chosen career area. You will be paid approximately £100 a week.

To research into different apprenticeship schemes look atwhich has a wealth of information and advertises a number of vacancies. Register on the site if you are interested in receiving details on specific apprenticeships schemes.

Some companies have set timescales when they recruit. It is important if you are considering an apprenticeship scheme that you look into opportunities and apply early.

Higher Apprenticeships:

A typical entry criteria:A minimum of 5GCSEs (or equivalent) at Grade B or above. Have or are predicted to gain 3 A Levels or equivalent at grades B or above.

Apprenticeships in some careers offer the opportunity of doing a Foundation Degree program. This is a two-year program where you will be expected to study at university level either by attending university on a day release or distance learning.

Careers Programme 2022-23

Aims and Outcomes: Enable all students access to a careers programme, career guidance and resources.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Access to careers library (based in main library)
  • Links to useful websites accessible

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 2, 4
  • 1, 2, 3, 4

(Ongoing and available at all times)

Aims and Outcomes

Introduction to careers and the world of work. Understand the link between subject choice and future careers.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog introduction and careers library treasure hunt activity
  • Unifrog – What are skills
  • Unifrog – Interests profile
  • DWP* – Link between school and work
  • National Apprenticeship Week
  • Unifrog – What’s your dream job
  • National Careers Week
  • DWP* – My Skills
  • Unifrog – Recording activities
  • Meet the industry: Live employer talks
  • Tutor-time Activities

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Module 1)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 2)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 4, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 3 (Module 5)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Ongoing)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Ongoing)

Aims and Outcomes

Exploring, understanding and identifying career ideas and pathways. Identifying key responsibilities and contributing factors to the world of work.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog – Introduction and careers library treasure hunt 2 activity
  • Unifrog – Career terminology
  • Unifrog – What does success mean to you
  • KMPF – Why go to university assembly
  • National Apprenticeship Week
  • Unifrog – Your superhero CV
  • DWP* – Employability skills
  • National Careers Week
  • Meet the industry: Live employer talks
  • Unifrog – What makes a great communicator
  • Career aspiration visit to primary schools – Dartford Primary Academy
  • Tutor-time activities

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 3 (Module 1)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Module 2)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 5)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (Module 5-6)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Ongoing)

Aims and Outcomes

Careers research and planning. Explore and choose GCSE options.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog – Introduction and identifying interests
  • Unifrog – GCSE choices choices
  • Enact – NHS Success, drama based presentation
  • Unifrog – Leadership
  • DWP* – Making choices
  • National Apprenticeship Week
  • Unifrog – Careers library treasure hunt 3
  • National Careers Week
  • Meet the industry: Live employer talks – RAF
  • Unifrog – Your skills, your team, your future
  • CXK – Apprenticeships assembly
  • Career and GCSE options guidance
  • Tutor-time activities

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 3 (Module 1)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Module 2)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Module 2)
  • 1, 3 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 5)
  • 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 (Module 5)
  • 1, 3, 8 (On request)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5(Ongoing)

Aims and Outcomes

Connecting subject decisions to careers. Prepare and partake in work experience.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog introduction and personality profiling
  • Unifrog – How to research possible placements
  • Unifrog – How to contact employers
  • University of Greenwich – Why go to University MythBuster Assembly
  • DWP* – Job search
  • National Apprenticeship Week
  • Univeristy of Kent visit
  • Unifrog – CVs and cover letters
  • DWP* – Employability skills
  • Meet the industry: Live employer talks – RAF
  • National Careers Week 2022
  • Work experience week
  • Year 10 Bluewater Challenge – Business Studies Students
  • Unifrog – Careers library treasure hunt 4
  • Post-16 options talk
  • Tutor-time Activities
  • Careers Bulletin

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 3 (Module 1)
  • 1, 2, 3 (Module 2)
  • 1, 5 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3, 5, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 5 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3, 4, 5, 6 (Module 4)
  • 1, 4, 5, 6 (Modules 4-5)
  • 1, 2, 3 (Module 5)
  • 1, 3, 4, 7 (Module 5)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Module 6)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Ongoing)

Aims and Outcomes

Further one’s career knowledge and development. Decide on Post-16 options and apply.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog – Introductions and Post 16 choices, choices activity
  • The Education People – Kent choices
  • Post-16 options talk
  • Unifrog – A-Level choices
  • Career guidance interviews
  • Unifrog – Busting BTEC myths
  • DWP* – LMI & jobs of the future
  • University of Greenwich – Why go to University MythBuster Assembly
  • Bellway Apprenticeships
  • National Apprenticeship Week
  • Unifrog – Apprenticeships
  • National Careers Week
  • Unifrog – Revision techniques
  • Meet the industry: Live employer talks
  • Tutor-time activities
  • Careers Bulletin

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 3, 7 (Module 1)
  • 1, 3, 5 (Module 1)
  • 1, 3, 4, 7(Module 1)
  • 1, 3, 4, 7 (Module 2)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 (Modules 2-4)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 5 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3, 5, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 5, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 (Module 3)
  • 1 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 5)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Ongoing)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Ongoing)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Ongoing)

Aims and Outcomes

Explore post-18 options.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog – Introduction and goal setting activity
  • Unifrog – Curating your online profile social media
  • Careers Clinic Drop-In
  • Unifrog – Post 18 choices choices
  • University of Greenwich E-Mentoring (Pilot – Business & Finance Students)
  • Unifrog – Geeking out
  • Meet the industry: Live employer talks – RAF
  • Unifrog – Acing your personal statement
  • Post-18 option talks
  • Work Experience Week
  • Higher education / University visits / UCAS Exhibition visit

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 3 (Module 1)
  • 1, 3 (Module 2)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 (Modules 2-4)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4 (Module 3)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 5)
  • 1, 3, 4, 7 (Module 5)
  • 1, 3, 4, 5, 6 (Module 6)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 (Module 6)

Aims and Outcomes

Post-18 options and beyond.

Activity

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • Unifrog – Introduction and finalising personal statements
  • Higher education / University visits
  • Prep for University applications
  • Unifrog – the basic of interviews
  • Careers Clinic Drop In
  • Unifrog – Revision
  • Unifrog – Assessment centres
  • Interview Skills workshop
  • CXK – Apprenticeship workshop
  • CV workshop

Gatsby Benchmarks

  • 1, 3 (Module 1)
  • 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 (Module 1)
  • 1, 3 (Module 1)
  • 1, 3, 4 (Module 2)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 (Modules 2-4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 3)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 (Module 4)
  • 1, 3 (Module 4)

* DWP = Department for Work and Pensions

* KMPF = Kent and Medway Progression Federation

* KaMCOP = Kent and Medway Collaborative Outreach Programme (Kent Universities)

Work experience is a statutory requirement in the Post-16 curriculum and provides our young people with an insight into the day to day of working life.They will have the opportunity to sample a particular career of interest and gain important employability skills. It will also allow students to reflect on their skills and gain an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses. Acquiring experiences of the workplace aids in future employment and acts as excellent references in Post-18 choices.

Work experience placements can take place at any point in term time, limited to a maximum of 2 weeks, with authorised absence from the Post-16 team except during public examinations and at exam board deadlines. We encourage students to seek placements during holidays or when their timetable allows, this could be one day per week over consecutive weeks. Work placements must be sought-out and arranged by the students and their parents/carers. Advice and support is available at all times by the careers team at The 鶹ӳ.

A Work Experience Form must be completed in full and returned to Kim Mace-Baker or their tutor at least 4 weeks prior to the placement for necessary health and safety checks to be made.

If you have any queries, please contact:

Providing Year 10 with the opportunity to take part in a one week work experience programme provides them with the understanding and knowledge of real world work and furnishes them with key employability skills which can then be applied to their CVs and personal statements.

We encourage all students to seek and apply for their own work experience, we recommend and will guide students to explore opportunities in an area that interests them and reflects their passions and abilities.

Students must make contact with employers under the guidance of an adult, use their school email address and not contact individuals via a social media platform.

If you have any queries, please contact:

Plan your future:

Hobbies and interests can help us by developing our Curriculum Vitae (CV) for future careers:

  • Armed Forces: If you have an interest in the armed forces you have the opportunity to join the cadets. (,,, and)
  • Drama and Dance: Students interested in careers in Performing arts should be involved in extracurricular activities. Networking is key to a successful career in this industry and the more performance that one is involved with the better the chances in the future. Employers/Universities/Colleges will expect a student to have a portfolio of work to demonstrate at interview. It is never too early to start preparing your portfolio.
    Performing arts improves our self-confidence, communication skills and expression.
  • Medical related careers: Careers in a large number of medical professions can be exceptionally competitive. The more that can be done prior to university/apprenticeship application can enhance your chances of success. Work experience in hospitals can be hard to find and you will have to be in Post 16 in the main to gain an opportunity, however, there are numerous organisations that you can join or volunteer with that will enhance you long term careers prospects.
    Consider gaining experience within the medical profession by volunteering with a charitable organisation (, and)
  • Sporting activities – Join a club: Team sports – Develops a wide range of skills including leadership, drive, determination and teamwork. There is a wide range of clubs to join in your local area.
  • Volunteering: Volunteering can enhance your long-term employment prospects as it will add additional experiences to your CV alongside your academic studies ( and)

Gatsby Benchmarks

The Gatsby Foundation put together 8 benchmarks designed to guide schools and colleges nationwide in educating and equipping students in Years 7 – 13 for future successful transitions from formal education into the world of work.

Benchmark 1

A stable careers programme

Benchmark 2

Learning from career and labour market information

Benchmark 3

Addressing the needs of each pupil

Benchmark 4

Linking curriculum learning to careers

Benchmark 5

Encounters with employers and employees

Benchmark 6

Experiences of workplaces

Benchmark 7

Encounters with further and higher education

Benchmark 8

Personal Guidance

Student Entitlement Statement

This is an entitlement statement based on Government requirements and Gatsby Benchmarks on a year-group basis as detailed below. It is also mapped to the CDI* Careers Framework (Career Development Institute).

Who is it for?

Pupils, parents / carers, stakeholders including organizations and companies wishing to support the pupils’ Careers Education and Learning.

It considers the needs of all pupils including those with SEN* or other specific requirements.

How is it reviewed?

It is reviewed and monitored on a regular basis by the Academy’s Careers Team (Careers Adviser, Careers Leader and Head of 6th Form) as well as the Principal, Governor linked to careers education. We also invite and include feedback and evaluation from parents/carers, pupils, stakeholders including employers and organisations.

How can I get involved?

If you are an Employer or linked to an organisation / company, we welcome your offer of support and you can access the Provider Access Policy on the careers page of the 鶹ӳ website.

If you are a pupil or parent / carer, we welcome your feedback at any time. You can do this verbally, in-writing via an email or letter, or complete a feedback form handed out to you. We collect feedback from 鶹ӳ* events, IAG interviews (careers Information, Advice and Guidance) and in other ways. If you have any ideas of how we can develop or improve our careers programme, please get in touch to share your views with us by emailing the Careers Lead Michael Williams: michael.williams@leighacademy.org.uk

All Year Groups

The careers library contains various up to date literature on a range of LMI* opportunities including apprenticeships, University prospectuses and more.

All year groups are entitled to a meaningful encounter with an employer or organisation to enhance their careers learning to help them develop their core career management skills.

The Leigh Aspire Programme is offered to high-achieving pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds and includes a range of trips, visits, workshops and activities for personal-development to increase their confidence. This is also designed to meet the Government-identified gap in who attends University, designed to encourage University applicants from poorer backgrounds.

Year 7

An introduction to the world of careers, and various personal development workshops.

Year 8

As above, plus support with accessing and deciding on GCSE options. This includes an Options Evening that all can access where a qualified Careers Adviser will be present to answer any questions and offer information, advice and guidance. Followed by 1-to-1 careers interviews (at request) or group workshops.

Year 9

Introduction to STEM* careers and pathways. Careers workshops and assemblies, personal development activities to build career management and employability skills.

Year 10

Support in arranging Work Experience.

鶹ӳ Annual Year 10 Careers Convention (a range of organisations, employers and colleges present covering a range of interest areas including Sport, The Army, Medicine, Teaching, Construction, Engineering, Creative Arts and much more.

Further workshops and assemblies including personal development activities.

Year 11

Access to impartial IAG* 1-to-1 interviews and workshops including information on apprenticeships and other pathways. This will include entry requirements for courses available, advice on planning future options and exploring different careers.

Assemblies on different vocational areas and choosing a range of post-16 options (this is not just 6th form but includes colleges, apprenticeships and other 6th form opportunities).

Sixth Form

Support and briefings on post-18 options including University, other HE* courses, degree apprenticeships, CV writing, mock interviews, personal statement writing and applying to UCAS for University.

Year 12 are also strongly encouraged to access Work Experience as well as any part-time job they may have, some support is offered but students usually take the lead in organising their own placements. This is to help them build their awareness and communication skills as well as career management skills necessary for their future.

Information and a range of resources are offered, however careers-based research is the responsibility of the student, for the reasons given above (research skills are required for many of their future options).

Some students can access Business Mentoring on a needs-basis.

SEND and Vulnerable Students

We prioritise SEN* pupils and they have access to specialist support in the SEN centre according to their needs and requirements. All SEN students are offered careers interviews at key-transition points such as year 8, 11 and 13.

Vulnerable students can include anyone from potential NEET (not engaged in employment or training after they finish year 11) and those who have additions concerns at home or at school – this includes young carers and pupils who are in-care or “looked after children”. We work as a team to identify these pupils and the support is then tailored according to priority and need.

We work closely with Local Authority funded support for example The Education People, IAG* professionals such as careers advisers, as well as supportive organisations.

CDI Framework References

The Careers Framework (CDI 2018) is a list of key skills, otherwise known as Core Competencies for successful career management. They are tailored to each Educational Key Stage group with examples of how they can be met.

It covers 3 main career-learning areas with 17 learning outcomes:

  1. Self-development (outcomes 1-3)
  2. Learning about Careers and Work (outcomes 4-8)
  3. Developing career management and employability skills (outcomes 10-17).

Glossary*:

  • IAG = Information Advice and Guidance (careers learning).
  • CDI = Career Development Institute (professional governing body for Careers Professionals)
  • 鶹ӳ = 鶹ӳ
  • HE = Higher Education (such as Universities)
  • LMI = Labour Market Information (this includes the diverse range of options, entry requirements for options, vacancy information, apprenticeships and exploring different careers or jobs.
  • SEN = Special Educational Needs

Careers Policies

Provider Access Statement Student Entitlement Statement 鶹ӳ CEIAG Policy